Mens Ties Free Shipping



Craig Reagin Clothiers "Business Spotlight"



Labana: Shaheed Bhai Mani Singh, Sukhwinder Singh, Baba Makhan Shah Labana, Ghotra, List of Labanas, Gulzar Lahoria, Jagir Kaur


Labana: Shaheed Bhai Mani Singh, Sukhwinder Singh, Baba Makhan Shah Labana, Ghotra, List of Labanas, Gulzar Lahoria, Jagir Kaur


$11.12


Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Shaheed Bhai Mani Singh, Labana, Sukhwinder Singh, Baba Makhan Shah Labana, Ghotra, List of Labanas, Gulzar Lahoria, Jagir Kaur, Rattan Singh Ajnala, Chaudary Lakhi Singh. Excerpt: Makhan Shah Lubana (Punjabi: , Makkha a ha Lab, also written as Lobana) (born July 7, 1619) was a devout Sikh and a rich trader from Tanda district Jhelum (now in Pakistan ) who discovered the ninth Guru of the Sikhs, Guru Tegh Bahadar in Bakala, India in around 1665. The Sakhi (true story) of that discovery was recorded in "Janamsakhis" and told as stories for many generations of Sikhs. Makhan was a merchant who used to bring valuable merchandise by sea and sell it wholesale in parts of Gujarat and Punjab in India. His ship was caught up in a furious storm while he was sailing, fully loaded with trade goods northwards, up the coast of India towards the Gulf of Khambhat. The ship was terribly damaged during the storm, with the force of lightning splitting the mainsail, the sails hanging in shreds, the ship taking on water and when it seemed like he would lose the ship, Makhan decided his time had come to remember his Guru and ask for his help. Completely powerless, he knelt down, and said his Ardas (prayed) to God and Guru Nanak for safety. "Baba jee", he prayed desperately, "Please save my ship and my men. I pledge the 500 gold mohars tied to the belt at my waist, which without your help will soon be at the bottom of the sea. Please accept this as my humble offering. He then recited this Shabad of Guru Arjan Dev: Aasaa, Fifth Mehl: Guru Granth Sahib Page 403 Punjabi: Transliteration: apunay sayvak kee aapay raakhai aapay naam japaavai. jah jah kaaj kirat sayvak kee tahaa tahaa uth Dhaavai. ((1)) sayvak ka-o niktee ho-ay dikhaavai. jo jo kahai thaakur peh sayvak

The Age of Big Business: A Chronicle of the Captains of Industry


The Age of Big Business: A Chronicle of the Captains of Industry


$24.95


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III THE EPIC OF STEEL It was the boast of a Roman Emperor that he had found the Eternal City brick and left it marble. Similarly the present generation of Americans inherited a country which was wood and have transformed it into steel. That which chiefly distinguishes the physical America of today from thai of forty years ago is the extensive use of this metal. Our fathers used steel very little in railway transportation; rails and locomotives were usually made of iron, and wood was the prevailing material for railroad bridges. Steel cars, both for passengers arid for freight, are now everywhere taking the place of the more flimsy substance. We travel today in steel subways, transact our business in steel buildings, and live in apartments and private houses which are made largely of steel. The steel automobile has long since supplanted the wooden carriage; the steel ship has displaced the iron and wooden vessel. The American farmer now encloses his lands with steel wire, the Southern planter binds his cotton with steel ties, and modern America could never gather her abundant harvests without her mighty agricultural implements, all of which are made of steel. Thus it is steel that shelters us, that transports us, that feeds us, and that even clothes us. This substance is such a commonplace element in our lives that we take it for granted, like air and water and the soil itself; yet the generation that fought the Civil War knew practically nothing of steel. They were familiar with thismetal only as a curiosity or as a material used for the finer kinds of cutlery. How many Americans realize that steel was used even less in 1865 than aluminum is used today? Nearly all the men who have made the American Steel Age - such as Carnegie, Phipps, Frick, and Schwab

The age of big business: a chronicle of the captains of industry


The age of big business: a chronicle of the captains of industry


$24.75


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III THE EPIC OF STEEL It was the boast of a Roman Emperor that he had found the Eternal City brick and left it marble. Similarly the present generation of Americans inherited a country which was wood and have transformed it into steel. That which chiefly distinguishes the physical America of today from thai of forty years ago is the extensive use of this metal. Our fathers used steel very little in railway transportation; rails and locomotives were usually made of iron, and wood was the prevailing material for railroad bridges. Steel cars, both for passengers arid for freight, are now everywhere taking the place of the more flimsy substance. We travel today in steel subways, transact our business in steel buildings, and live in apartments and private houses which are made largely of steel. The steel automobile has long since supplanted the wooden carriage; the steel ship has displaced the iron and wooden vessel. The American farmer now encloses his lands with steel wire, the Southern planter binds his cotton with steel ties, and modern America could never gather her abundant harvests without her mighty agricultural implements, all of which are made of steel. Thus it is steel that shelters us, that transports us, that feeds us, and that even clothes us. This substance is such a commonplace element in our lives that we take it for granted, like air and water and the soil itself; yet the generation that fought the Civil War knew practically nothing of steel. They were familiar with thismetal only as a curiosity or as a material used for the finer kinds of cutlery. How many Americans realize that steel was used even less in 1865 than aluminum is used today? Nearly all the men who have made the American Steel Age - such as Carnegie, Phipps, Frick, and Schwab

The Iron Pirate


The Iron Pirate


$19.99


Sir Max Pemberton (1863-1950) was a popular British novelist, working mainly in the adventure and mystery genres. He was the editor of boys' magazine Chums and Cassell's Magazine from 1896 to 1906. His most famous work The Iron Pirate was a bestseller of the early 1890s, and he became a prolific professional writer. It was followed by Captain Black (1911). He founded the London School of Journalism in 1920. Amongst his other works are The Impregnable City (1895), A Gentleman's Gentleman (1896), The Gold Wolf (1903), War and the Woman (1912) and Hindoo Khan (1922).

The age of big business: a chronicle of the captains of industry


The age of big business: a chronicle of the captains of industry


$24.75


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III THE EPIC OF STEEL It was the boast of a Roman Emperor that he had found the Eternal City brick and left it marble. Similarly the present generation of Americans inherited a country which was wood and have transformed it into steel. That which chiefly distinguishes the physical America of today from thai of forty years ago is the extensive use of this metal. Our fathers used steel very little in railway transportation; rails and locomotives were usually made of iron, and wood was the prevailing material for railroad bridges. Steel cars, both for passengers arid for freight, are now everywhere taking the place of the more flimsy substance. We travel today in steel subways, transact our business in steel buildings, and live in apartments and private houses which are made largely of steel. The steel automobile has long since supplanted the wooden carriage; the steel ship has displaced the iron and wooden vessel. The American farmer now encloses his lands with steel wire, the Southern planter binds his cotton with steel ties, and modern America could never gather her abundant harvests without her mighty agricultural implements, all of which are made of steel. Thus it is steel that shelters us, that transports us, that feeds us, and that even clothes us. This substance is such a commonplace element in our lives that we take it for granted, like air and water and the soil itself; yet the generation that fought the Civil War knew practically nothing of steel. They were familiar with thismetal only as a curiosity or as a material used for the finer kinds of cutlery. How many Americans realize that steel was used even less in 1865 than aluminum is used today? Nearly all the men who have made the American Steel Age - such as Carnegie, Phipps, Frick, and Schwab

Tales Of The Fish Patrol


Tales Of The Fish Patrol


$14.14


From oyster pirate to oyster cop, Jack London brings us adventure stories from the wild days of turn-of-the-century San Francisco.

Comments are closed.