Mens Ties For Less



How to Tie Neckties & Bow Ties : How to Sew a Necktie



Bathrobe


Bathrobe


$45


High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! A bathrobe, dressing gown or housecoat is a robe. A bathrobe is usually made from towelling or other absorbent fabric, and may be donned while wet, serving both as a towel and an informal garment. A dressing gown (for men) or a housecoat (for women) is a loose, open-fronted gown closed with a fabric belt that is put on over nightwear on rising from bed, or, less commonly today, worn over some day clothes when partially dressed or undressed in the morning or evening (for example, over a man's shirt and trousers without jacket and tie). The regular wearing of a dressing gown by men about the house is derived from the 18th-century wearing of the banyan in orientalist imitation. The Japanese yukata is an unlined, cotton kimono worn as a bathrobe or as summer outdoor clothing. Several styles of bathrobes are marketed to consumers, categorised by textile material and type of weave.

Bondage a la Carte


Bondage a la Carte


$7


Jurgen von Stuka, NOOK Book (eBook), English-language edition, Pub by Pink Flamingo Publications on 06-06-2014

Nothing Less


Nothing Less


$6


Reese Gabriel, NOOK Book (eBook), English-language edition, Pub by Pink Flamingo Publications on 12-12-2014

Gendered Paradoxes


Gendered Paradoxes


$45.32


In 2005 the World Bank released a gender assessment of the nation of Jordan, a country that, like many in the Middle East, has undergone dramatic social and gender transformations, in part by encouraging equal access to education for men and women. The resulting demographic picture there?highly educated women who still largely stay at home as mothers and caregivers? prompted the World Bank to label Jordan a? gender paradox. InGendered Paradoxes, Fida J. Adely shows that assessment to be a fallacy, taking readers into the rarely seen halls of a Jordanian public school?the al-Khatwa High School for Girls?and revealing the dynamic lives of its students, for whom such trends are far from paradoxical. Through the lives of these students, Adely explores the critical issues young people in Jordan grapple with today: nationalism and national identity, faith and the requisites of pious living, appropriate and respectable gender roles, and progress. In the process she shows the important place of education in Jordan, one less tied to the economic ends of labor and employment that are so emphasized by the rest of the developed world. In showcasing alternative values and the highly capable young women who hold them, Adely raises fundamental questions about what constitutes development, progress, and empowerment?not just for Jordanians, but for the whole world.

Children's Fashions 1900-1950 As Pictured in Sears Catalogs


Children's Fashions 1900-1950 As Pictured in Sears Catalogs


$16.95


Meticulously reproduced selection of pages from rare Sears catalogs chronicles what youngsters, ages 4 to 16, wore during the first half of the twentieth century. Descriptive captions accompany more than 300 illustrations-from flattering dresses with plunging necklines to men's wide, hand-painted ties. This is a rich social document that will be prized by historians, fashion enthusiasts, and anyone fascinated by clothing from a bygone era. 1914-knickerbocker suits for boys-less than $2.50; 1917-elegant organdy and chiffon party dresses for girls for $1.43; 1935-cowboy outfits and baseball uniforms for less than $2.00; 1941-sanforized overalls 3-piece playsuit and a pinafore dress for only $1.00!

Tennisspieler (Gro Britannien)


Tennisspieler (Gro Britannien)


$14.14


Kapitel: Greg Rusedski, Andrew Castle, Anne Keothavong, Olena Serhijiwna Baltatscha, Neil Broad, Laura Robson, H. Briggs, Algernon Kingscote, Heather Watson, Eileen Bennett, Alex Bogdanovic, George Alan Thomas, Phoebe Holcroft Watson, Winifred Mcnair, Phyllis Covell, Peggy Saunders, Agnes Morton, Freda James, Patrick Bowes-Lyon, Angela Buxton, Dorothy Shepherd-Barron, Billy Yorke, Herbert Wilberforce, Harold Barlow, Ermyntrude Harvey, Ernest Lewis, Anne Shilcock, Peggy Michell, Nancye Lyle. Aus Wikipedia. Nicht dargestellt. Auszug: Sir George Alan Thomas, Bart. (born Therapia, Turkey; 14 June 1881 - 23 July 1972) was a British chess, badminton and tennis player. He was twice British Chess Champion and a seven-time All-England Badminton champion. He also played in the semi-finals of the men's tennis doubles at Wimbledon in 1911. Thomas never married, so the hereditary Thomas baronetcy ended on his death. He was admired for his fine sportsmanship. Living most of his life in London and Godalming, Thomas was British Chess Champion in 1923 and 1934. He shared first prize at the 1934/5 Hastings International Chess Congress in very good company, tying with the next world chess champion Max Euwe and leading Soviet player Salo Flohr, ahead of past and future world champions José Raúl Capablanca and Mikhail Botvinnik, whom he defeated in their individual games. Thomas also defeated Euwe in tournament play and held Alekhine to six draws. His 'lifetime' scores against the world's elite were however less flattering: he had minuses against Emanuel Lasker (-1, not counting a win in a Lasker simultaneous exhibition in 1896), Capablanca (+1-5=3), Alekhine (-7=6), Efim Bogoljubov (-5=3), Euwe (+1-9=2), Flohr (+2-9=4) and Savielly Tartakower (+3-9=10). He also fared badly against Edgard Colle (+1-9=8). More impressively, he did manage even scores with Botvinnik (+1-1), Richard Réti (+3-3=1) and

The Age of Big Business: A Chronicle of the Captains of Industry


The Age of Big Business: A Chronicle of the Captains of Industry


$24.95


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III THE EPIC OF STEEL It was the boast of a Roman Emperor that he had found the Eternal City brick and left it marble. Similarly the present generation of Americans inherited a country which was wood and have transformed it into steel. That which chiefly distinguishes the physical America of today from thai of forty years ago is the extensive use of this metal. Our fathers used steel very little in railway transportation; rails and locomotives were usually made of iron, and wood was the prevailing material for railroad bridges. Steel cars, both for passengers arid for freight, are now everywhere taking the place of the more flimsy substance. We travel today in steel subways, transact our business in steel buildings, and live in apartments and private houses which are made largely of steel. The steel automobile has long since supplanted the wooden carriage; the steel ship has displaced the iron and wooden vessel. The American farmer now encloses his lands with steel wire, the Southern planter binds his cotton with steel ties, and modern America could never gather her abundant harvests without her mighty agricultural implements, all of which are made of steel. Thus it is steel that shelters us, that transports us, that feeds us, and that even clothes us. This substance is such a commonplace element in our lives that we take it for granted, like air and water and the soil itself; yet the generation that fought the Civil War knew practically nothing of steel. They were familiar with thismetal only as a curiosity or as a material used for the finer kinds of cutlery. How many Americans realize that steel was used even less in 1865 than aluminum is used today? Nearly all the men who have made the American Steel Age - such as Carnegie, Phipps, Frick, and Schwab

The Price of Malice (Joe Gunther Series #20)


The Price of Malice (Joe Gunther Series #20)


$1.99


THE BEST POLICE-PROCEDURAL SERIES IN AMERICA."-Chicago Tribune Joe Gunther's Vermont Bureau of Investigation team is plenty busy trying to solve the grisly murder of Wayne Castine, a suspected child predator who's got mob ties in the area. But Gunther has other pressing, more personal business to attend to: the old case of his girlfriend Lyn Silva's father and brother. Fishermen both, they were once believed to be lost at sea. Until today…"With its excellent noir touches, terrific plots, and really interesting central character. The Joe Gunther series is one of the best around."-Globe and Mail (Toronto)With the Castine investigation in full swing, now is hardly the time for Gunther to go AWOL and join Lyn in Maine. But as more evidence emerges, the less it seems that the Silvas were innocent victims. Turns out they had some involvement with a gang of vicious smugglers-men who will do whatever it takes to keep Lyn and Gunther from finding the truth…and who will kill to keep old secrets buried. "Mayor's skills are equal to the vigor of his imagination, and we take his word for every twist, every turn, every thunderbolt."-New Yorker

The Price of Malice (Joe Gunther Series #20)


The Price of Malice (Joe Gunther Series #20)


$7.99


THE BEST POLICE-PROCEDURAL SERIES IN AMERICA."-Chicago Tribune Joe Gunther's Vermont Bureau of Investigation team is plenty busy trying to solve the grisly murder of Wayne Castine, a suspected child predator who's got mob ties in the area. But Gunther has other pressing, more personal business to attend to: the old case of his girlfriend Lyn Silva's father and brother. Fishermen both, they were once believed to be lost at sea. Until today…"With its excellent noir touches, terrific plots, and really interesting central character. The Joe Gunther series is one of the best around."-Globe and Mail (Toronto)With the Castine investigation in full swing, now is hardly the time for Gunther to go AWOL and join Lyn in Maine. But as more evidence emerges, the less it seems that the Silvas were innocent victims. Turns out they had some involvement with a gang of vicious smugglers-men who will do whatever it takes to keep Lyn and Gunther from finding the truth…and who will kill to keep old secrets buried."Mayor's skills are equal to the vigor of his imagination, and we take his word for every twist, every turn, every thunderbolt."-New Yorker

The Old English Manor


The Old English Manor


$32.99


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II. The Lord And The Tenantry. We have now taken a bird's-eye view of the surroundings within which the daily life of the manor was spent, and are ready to return to the discussion of the persons who took part in this life and activity. Who these were we have already indicated in the description of the manor itself but a more careful examination may now be made. First as to the status of the lord and the people who tilled his lands. In analyzing such status we come at once upon lines of distinction not easy to explain in terms of the present day. The simplest distinction which can be made between the various classes of men is that between the free and the unfree. But freedom in our sense was not in those days the desirable quantity that it is now. Such a condition as that of even approximately complete freedom would not have been understood by the Anglo- Saxon ceorl. Freedom was purely a relative quantity; it was not an abstract conception; it was freedom in respect of some one or something else, either the lord, the state, the Church or the lands which the individual himself cultivated. The king alone was free in respect of all other men; the thegn was free in respect of all save the king and the state, toward whom he was in bond for certain duties; the ceorl was in bond to his lord and the land on which he dwelt, he was only technically a liber homo, free before the law and privileged to take oath, bear arms and receive wergeld; but in respect of other men he was free only whencontrasted with the slave, in other words he was in a position of greater or less serfdom; while the slave was in bond toward all, a mere chattel, having no rights properly so called, tied to the soil, sold with it and classed among his lord's cattle. The king alone was free, the slave

The Old English Manor


The Old English Manor


$36.99


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II. The Lord And The Tenantry. We have now taken a bird's-eye view of the surroundings within which the daily life of the manor was spent, and are ready to return to the discussion of the persons who took part in this life and activity. Who these were we have already indicated in the description of the manor itself but a more careful examination may now be made. First as to the status of the lord and the people who tilled his lands. In analyzing such status we come at once upon lines of distinction not easy to explain in terms of the present day. The simplest distinction which can be made between the various classes of men is that between the free and the unfree. But freedom in our sense was not in those days the desirable quantity that it is now. Such a condition as that of even approximately complete freedom would not have been understood by the Anglo- Saxon ceorl. Freedom was purely a relative quantity; it was not an abstract conception; it was freedom in respect of some one or something else, either the lord, the state, the Church or the lands which the individual himself cultivated. The king alone was free in respect of all other men; the thegn was free in respect of all save the king and the state, toward whom he was in bond for certain duties; the ceorl was in bond to his lord and the land on which he dwelt, he was only technically a liber homo, free before the law and privileged to take oath, bear arms and receive wergeld; but in respect of other men he was free only whencontrasted with the slave, in other words he was in a position of greater or less serfdom; while the slave was in bond toward all, a mere chattel, having no rights properly so called, tied to the soil, sold with it and classed among his lord's cattle. The king alone was free, the slave

The Old English Manor


The Old English Manor


$29.75


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II. The Lord And The Tenantry. We have now taken a bird's-eye view of the surroundings within which the daily life of the manor was spent, and are ready to return to the discussion of the persons who took part in this life and activity. Who these were we have already indicated in the description of the manor itself but a more careful examination may now be made. First as to the status of the lord and the people who tilled his lands. In analyzing such status we come at once upon lines of distinction not easy to explain in terms of the present day. The simplest distinction which can be made between the various classes of men is that between the free and the unfree. But freedom in our sense was not in those days the desirable quantity that it is now. Such a condition as that of even approximately complete freedom would not have been understood by the Anglo- Saxon ceorl. Freedom was purely a relative quantity; it was not an abstract conception; it was freedom in respect of some one or something else, either the lord, the state, the Church or the lands which the individual himself cultivated. The king alone was free in respect of all other men; the thegn was free in respect of all save the king and the state, toward whom he was in bond for certain duties; the ceorl was in bond to his lord and the land on which he dwelt, he was only technically a liber homo, free before the law and privileged to take oath, bear arms and receive wergeld; but in respect of other men he was free only whencontrasted with the slave, in other words he was in a position of greater or less serfdom; while the slave was in bond toward all, a mere chattel, having no rights properly so called, tied to the soil, sold with it and classed among his lord's cattle. The king alone was free, the slave

The age of big business: a chronicle of the captains of industry


The age of big business: a chronicle of the captains of industry


$24.75


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III THE EPIC OF STEEL It was the boast of a Roman Emperor that he had found the Eternal City brick and left it marble. Similarly the present generation of Americans inherited a country which was wood and have transformed it into steel. That which chiefly distinguishes the physical America of today from thai of forty years ago is the extensive use of this metal. Our fathers used steel very little in railway transportation; rails and locomotives were usually made of iron, and wood was the prevailing material for railroad bridges. Steel cars, both for passengers arid for freight, are now everywhere taking the place of the more flimsy substance. We travel today in steel subways, transact our business in steel buildings, and live in apartments and private houses which are made largely of steel. The steel automobile has long since supplanted the wooden carriage; the steel ship has displaced the iron and wooden vessel. The American farmer now encloses his lands with steel wire, the Southern planter binds his cotton with steel ties, and modern America could never gather her abundant harvests without her mighty agricultural implements, all of which are made of steel. Thus it is steel that shelters us, that transports us, that feeds us, and that even clothes us. This substance is such a commonplace element in our lives that we take it for granted, like air and water and the soil itself; yet the generation that fought the Civil War knew practically nothing of steel. They were familiar with thismetal only as a curiosity or as a material used for the finer kinds of cutlery. How many Americans realize that steel was used even less in 1865 than aluminum is used today? Nearly all the men who have made the American Steel Age - such as Carnegie, Phipps, Frick, and Schwab

The age of big business: a chronicle of the captains of industry


The age of big business: a chronicle of the captains of industry


$24.75


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III THE EPIC OF STEEL It was the boast of a Roman Emperor that he had found the Eternal City brick and left it marble. Similarly the present generation of Americans inherited a country which was wood and have transformed it into steel. That which chiefly distinguishes the physical America of today from thai of forty years ago is the extensive use of this metal. Our fathers used steel very little in railway transportation; rails and locomotives were usually made of iron, and wood was the prevailing material for railroad bridges. Steel cars, both for passengers arid for freight, are now everywhere taking the place of the more flimsy substance. We travel today in steel subways, transact our business in steel buildings, and live in apartments and private houses which are made largely of steel. The steel automobile has long since supplanted the wooden carriage; the steel ship has displaced the iron and wooden vessel. The American farmer now encloses his lands with steel wire, the Southern planter binds his cotton with steel ties, and modern America could never gather her abundant harvests without her mighty agricultural implements, all of which are made of steel. Thus it is steel that shelters us, that transports us, that feeds us, and that even clothes us. This substance is such a commonplace element in our lives that we take it for granted, like air and water and the soil itself; yet the generation that fought the Civil War knew practically nothing of steel. They were familiar with thismetal only as a curiosity or as a material used for the finer kinds of cutlery. How many Americans realize that steel was used even less in 1865 than aluminum is used today? Nearly all the men who have made the American Steel Age - such as Carnegie, Phipps, Frick, and Schwab

The Old English Manor


The Old English Manor


$36.99


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER II. The Lord And The Tenantry. We have now taken a bird's-eye view of the surroundings within which the daily life of the manor was spent, and are ready to return to the discussion of the persons who took part in this life and activity. Who these were we have already indicated in the description of the manor itself but a more careful examination may now be made. First as to the status of the lord and the people who tilled his lands. In analyzing such status we come at once upon lines of distinction not easy to explain in terms of the present day. The simplest distinction which can be made between the various classes of men is that between the free and the unfree. But freedom in our sense was not in those days the desirable quantity that it is now. Such a condition as that of even approximately complete freedom would not have been understood by the Anglo- Saxon ceorl. Freedom was purely a relative quantity; it was not an abstract conception; it was freedom in respect of some one or something else, either the lord, the state, the Church or the lands which the individual himself cultivated. The king alone was free in respect of all other men; the thegn was free in respect of all save the king and the state, toward whom he was in bond for certain duties; the ceorl was in bond to his lord and the land on which he dwelt, he was only technically a liber homo, free before the law and privileged to take oath, bear arms and receive wergeld; but in respect of other men he was free only whencontrasted with the slave, in other words he was in a position of greater or less serfdom; while the slave was in bond toward all, a mere chattel, having no rights properly so called, tied to the soil, sold with it and classed among his lord's cattle. The king alone was free, the slave

The Life Of Michael Davitt


The Life Of Michael Davitt


$28.75


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: tie. When those above him countermanded their orders, Davitt led his men back to their homes, disposing of his personal valuables to aid his less fortunate comrades. CHAPTER III. Davitt As A Literary Man- His Arrest, Trial, And Pbison Sufferings. " O God 1 why should so brave a man His noble life thus yield? A patriot would rather die Upon the battle-field. But England's judges doomed the man- Alas! that it should be; Let others emulate him still, And Ireland will. be free." As a literary man, Michael Davitt stands high. He is a man of educated thought, and wide and varied reading. Among his many accomplishments is a thorough knowledge of the Irish, French, and Italian languages, whilst the purest English is to be found in his public utterances. In the re-organization of the Irish movement, which followed the attempt on Chester Castle, and while the British Government were doing to death the martyrs-Allen, Larkin, and O'Brien- Davitt threw into the movement his whole heartand soul, and worked with grim energy to repair the breaches made in the Irish national ranks, selecting the most dangerous work of arming the people. While thus engaged, he was arrested in London on May 14, 1870, with a gunsmith named John Wilson, from Birmingham; the latter being in no way associated with the revolutionary movement, and not being supposed to know the uses intended for the arms which he sold. The following particulars of his trial at Newgate are gleaned from the London Central Criminal Court Petty Sessions papers:- He was indicted for feloniously conspiring to depose the Queen, and to levy war against her. The Attorney-General, the Solicitor-General, Mr. Cole, Mr. Poland, and Mr. Archibald conducted the prosecution. The first witness, Detective Seal, of

Cut Throat Pirate Adult Mens Costume


Cut Throat Pirate Adult Mens Costume


$39.99


Yo ho ho and a bottle of rum - you've killed a man for less in this Cut Throat Pirate adult mens costume. This great pirate costume includes a poly shirt with lace treatment, double knit poly pants, head tie, boot covers, a belt, and wrist cuffs. Lest anyone think you've gone soft, add a Pirate Sword, available separately\n\nCut throat pirate adult mens costume includes a poly shirt with lace treatment, double kint poly pants, head tie, boot covers, a belt and wrist cuffs.

ECCO Holton Plain Toe Tie - Men's


ECCO Holton Plain Toe Tie - Men's


$179.95


Slightly less formal, yet bringing a polished look to work and casual ensembles, the ECCO Holton Plain Toe Tie derby shoe offers remarkable comfort with a direct-inject polyurethane outsole for a lightweight, impact-absorbing step.

Letters On The Trinity And On The Divinity Of Christ


Letters On The Trinity And On The Divinity Of Christ


$21.75


Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www. million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: than the Jewish Scriptures of our duty, and of our destiny, -of the objects of our hopes and fears-of the character of God and the way of salvation. I agree fully, that whatever in the Old Testament respects the Jews, simply as Jews-e. g, their ritual, their food, their dress, their civil polity, their government-in a word, whatever from its nature was national and local-is not binding upon us under the Christian dispensation. I am well satisfied, too, that the character of God and the duty of men were, in many respects, less clearly revealed under the ancient dispensation than they now are. " The law was given by Moses; " but " no man hath seen God at any time; the only-begotten, who dwelleth in the bosom of the Father, tie hath revealed him,"-i. e, it was reserved for Christ to make a full display of the divine character;-no man, no prophet, who preceded him, ever had such knowledge of God as enabled him to do it. I am aware that many Christians do not seem to understand this passage; and, with well-meaning but mistaken views, undertake to deduce the character and designs of God as fully and as clearly from the Old Testament as from the New. I must believe, too, that the duties of Christians are, in most respects, more fully and definitely taught in the gospel than in the Old Testament; and I cannot approve of that method of reasoning which deduces our duties principally from texts in the Old Testament that sometimes are less clear, when the NewTestament presents the same subjects in such characters of light that he who runneth may read. But when you say, " Jesus Christ is the only master of Christians; and whatever he taught, either during his personal ministry, or by his inspired Apostles, we regard as of divine authority,

Nyx in the House of Night: Mythology, Folklore and Religion in the PC and Kristin Cast Vampyre Series


Nyx in the House of Night: Mythology, Folklore and Religion in the PC and Kristin Cast Vampyre Series


$9.99


The House of Night is no ordinary school-and not just because it's for vampyres. It's a place where magic, religion, folklore, and mythology from multiple traditions merry meet and meld to create something incredible and new. In Nyx in the House of Night-a 2-color illustrated companion to the House of Night series-some of your favorite YA authors, plus a few experts, help you navigate the influences behind the House of Night series in a guide that would get even Damien's seal of approval. Travel with P.C. Cast as she gets her first tattoo in Ireland, climbs the ruins of Sgiach's castle, and discovers the lore that led to the Isle of Skye vampyres. Read Kristin Cast's defense of women in history and mythology who, like Zoey, have made a practice of juggling multiple men. Sit in on a vampyre lecture by Bryan Lankford, the real-life basis for House of Night instructor Dragon Lankford, on the parallels between Wiccan and vampyre circle rituals. Tour Tulsa's House of Night landmarks with local Amy H. Sturgis. Plus: Karen Mahoney on Nyx and other goddesses of the night John Edgar Browning on vampires in folklore, fiction, and reality Jana Oliver on tattoos and other Marks Ellen Steiber on feline familiars Yasmine Galenorn on priestesses and goddess worship Jordon Dane on Zoey's Cherokee heritage Jeri Smith-Ready on the Raven Mockers and Kalona's less than heavenly inspiration Christine Zika on the connection between Nyx and the Virgin Mary Triniy Faegen on the Greek version of the OtherworldNyx in the House of Night also includes an appendix of character names that reveals the myth behind Zoey's last name, which House of Night cats have ties to Camelot, Egypt, and Middle-earth, and more!

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