Mens Suits Los Angeles



Fashion Advice for Men : How to Dress for a 1st Date - Men



FAB: A Novel


FAB: A Novel


$19


Get set to meet the fearless, funny, and feisty girlfriends of FAB: Bianca has left her job in fashion and her best friends in New York to pursue an offer in Los Angeles. While the West Coast attitude and weather suit her fine, the men she meets and the salary cut she takes put living the good life way out of reach. Carolyn, whose fabulous career in advertising is built on selling the idealized female body, is obsessed with her own failure to fit the image. Certain that no man will love her as long as she isn't model-thin, she comforts herself with designer shoes and Taco Bell binges. Taylor is the high-powered, foul-mouthed chick that women love to hate. Her salary at a New York law firm provides for a lavish lifestyle-when she finds the time to have a life. Roxanne is an actress with eight years of struggle under her belt. While suffering through countless demoralizing auditions for "fly girl #1," she dreams of landing roles that will inspire the masses and pay the bills.

Murder at the Sleepy Lagoon: Zoot Suits, Race, and Riot in Wartime L.A.


Murder at the Sleepy Lagoon: Zoot Suits, Race, and Riot in Wartime L.A.


$23.99


The notorious 1942 "Sleepy Lagoon" murder trial in Los Angeles concluded with the conviction of seventeen young Mexican American men for the alleged gang slaying of fellow youth Jose Diaz. Just five months later, the so-called Zoot Suit Riot erupted, as white soldiers in the city attacked minority youths and burned their distinctive zoot suits. Eduardo Obregon Pagan here provides the first comprehensive social history of both the trial and the riot and argues that they resulted from a volatile mix of racial and social tensions that had long been simmering. In reconstructing the lives of the murder victim and those accused of the crime, Pagan contends that neither the convictions (which were based on little hard evidence) nor the ensuing riot arose simply from anti-Mexican sentiment. He demonstrates instead that a variety of pre-existing stresses, including demographic pressures, anxiety about nascent youth culture, and the war effort all contributed to the social tension and the eruption of violence. Moreover, he recovers a multidimensional picture of Los Angeles during World War II that incorporates the complex intersections of music, fashion, violence, race relations, and neighborhood activism. Drawing upon overlooked evidence, Pagan concludes by reconstructing the murder scene and proposes a compelling theory about what really happened the night of the murder.

Zoot Suit: The Enigmatic Career of an Extreme Style


Zoot Suit: The Enigmatic Career of an Extreme Style


$19.95


ZOOT SUIT (n.): the ultimate in clothes. The only totally and truly American civilian suit-Cab Calloway, The Hepster's Dictionary, 1944Before the fashion statements of hippies, punks, or hip-hop, there was the zoot suit, a striking urban look of the World War II era that captivated the imagination. Created by poor African American men and obscure tailors, the "drape shape" was embraced by Mexican American pachucos, working-class youth, entertainers, and swing dancers, yet condemned by the U.S. government as wasteful and unpatriotic in a time of war. The fashion became notorious when it appeared to trigger violence and disorder in Los Angeles in 1943-events forever known as the "zoot suit riot." In its wake, social scientists, psychiatrists, journalists, and politicians all tried to explain the riddle of the zoot suit, transforming it into a multifaceted symbol: to some, a sign of social deviance and psychological disturbance, to others, a gesture of resistance against racial prejudice and discrimination. As controversy swirled at home, young men in other places-French zazous, South African tsotsi, Trinidadian saga boys, and Russian stiliagi-made the American zoot suit their own. In Zoot Suit, historian Kathy Peiss explores this extreme fashion and its mysterious career during World War II and after, as it spread from Harlem across the United States and around the world. She traces the unfolding history of this style and its importance to the youth who adopted it as their uniform, and at the same time considers the way public figures, experts, political activists, and historians have interpreted it. This outré style was a turning point in the way we understand the meaning of clothing as an expression of social conditions and power relations. Zoot Suit offers a new perspective on youth culture and the politics of style, tracing the seam between fashion and social action.

Zoot-Suit Murders


Zoot-Suit Murders


$9.99


It's the tumultuous days of World War II and from the mean streets of the Los Angeles barrio to the mansions of the Hollywood Hills the atmosphere is choked with tension. Nathan Younger, an undercover agent, is investigating the brutal murder of two FBI men and the infiltration of zoot-suit gangs by fascists when he crosses paths with Kathleen La Rue, a beautiful apostle of a bizarre religious cult. The search for the killers leads these two improbable lovers along a dangerous trail of heroin pushers, movie stars, and fanatical politicians. Like his lavishly praised novels Rabbit Boss and Mile Zero, Thomas Sanchez's Zoot-Suit Murders combines a tautly arched narrative with fiercely visual prose and a starkly revisionist view of the American melting pot.

Zoot-Suit Riots: The Psychology of Symbolic Annihilation


Zoot-Suit Riots: The Psychology of Symbolic Annihilation


$19.95


Los Angeles, the summer of 1943. For ten days in June, Anglo servicemen and civilians clashed in the streets of the city with young Mexican Americans whose fingertip coats and pegged, draped trousers announced their rebellion. At their height, the riots involved several thousand men and women, fighting with fists, rocks, sticks, and sometimes knives. In the end none were killed, few were seriously injured, and property damage was slight and yet, even today, the zoot-suit riots are remembered and hold emotional and symbolic significance for Mexican Americans and Anglos alike. The causes of the rioting were complex, as Mazón demonstrates in this illuminating analysis of their psychodynamics. Based in part on previously undisclosed FBI and military records, this engrossing study goes beyond sensational headlines and biased memories to provide an understanding of the zoot-suit riots in the context of both Mexican American and Anglo social history.

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