Mens Suits Kansas City





Everlasting Stream: A True Story of Rabbits, Guns, Friendship, and Family


Everlasting Stream: A True Story of Rabbits, Guns, Friendship, and Family


$17


Hailed as a Best Book of 2002 by Newsday and a Noteworthy Book by the Kansas City Star, The Everlasting Stream received glowing praise in hardcover. When Walt Harrington was first invited to spend Thanksgiving on his father-in-law's farm in rural Kentucky, he was a high-profile reporter for The Washington Post who had, over the years, developed a distaste for the archaic men who kill animals for sport. Little did he know that over the next twelve years of Thanksgiving cottontail hunts, his companions that first morning - four African-American country men and lifelong friends who seemed to have nothing in common with the white city slicker - would change not only his opinions about hunting, but also his feelings about the things that mattered to him the most. In crisp, often poetic prose that brings autumn mornings crackling to life, The Everlasting Stream shares the lessons that convinced Harrington to leave the city at the top of his career, eventually to introduce his growing son to a world of life, death, nature, and manhood that seemed more rewarding to him than his beltway existence of traffic jams and designer suits.

The Ls Brand


The Ls Brand


$29.79


In the spring of 1881, W.M.D. Lee and Lucien B. Scott, wealthy businessmen of Leavenworth, Kansas, purchased land in the upper Texas Panhandle to establish the Lee-Scott Cattle Company. Their range sprawled across four Texas counties and extended into eastern New Mexico. About six months later, fifty thousand head of mixed cattle, branded LS, grazed those thousands of acres of free grass. This book is the story of Lee and Scott?s LS Ranch from the tempestuous years of the open range to the era of? bob wire. It is also the story of the pioneer men and women whose efforts developed the LS into a cattle empire: W.M.D. and Lena Lee, Lucien and Julia Scott, ?Mister Mac? and? Miss Annie? McAllister, and Charles and Pauline Whitman. Here are accounts of chuck wagons and wagon bosses; prairie fires, blizzards, and bog holes; ranch management problems and cowboys on strike; lobo wolves and romance; wild sprees in Tascosa and its? Hogtown? sector; LS cowboys fighting against a gang of organized rustlers in a feud that ended in tragedy; and those same cowboys on the long trails to Dodge City and Montana. Drawing upon stories told to her by men and women who were with the LS during the 1880?s and later years, Dulcie Sullivan presents her narrative in a clear, straightforward, but sympathetic manner that gives the reader a vivid sense of how life was really lived there in those times. Especially telling is her occasional use of an almost poetic incident: the steers bedding down around a campfire to listen to the chuck-wagon cook play his fiddle, or the suit of Spanish armor found in a spring, or the hail-battered trees attempting to renew themselves, despite their grotesque shapes.

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