Mens Suits From 1920



M&S sponsored oppression



Beasts, Men and Gods


Beasts, Men and Gods


$7.99


In the beginning of the year 1920 I happened to be living in the Siberian town of Krasnoyarsk, situated on the shores of the River Yenisei, that noble stream which is cradled in the sun-bathed mountains of Mongolia to pour its warming life into the Arctic Ocean and to whose mouth Nansen has twice come to open the shortest road for commerce from Europe to the heart of Asia. There in the depths of the still Siberian winter I was suddenly caught up in the whirling storm of mad revolution raging all over Russia, sowing in this peaceful and rich land vengeance, hate, bloodshed and crimes that go unpunished by the law. No one could tell the hour of his fate. The people lived from day to day and left their homes not knowing whether they should return to them or whether they should be dragged from the streets and thrown into the dungeons of that travesty of courts, the Revolutionary Committee, more terrible and more bloody than those of the Mediaeval Inquisition. We who were strangers in this distraught land were not saved from its persecutions and I personally lived through them. One morning, when I had gone out to see a friend, I suddenly received the news that twenty Red soldiers had surrounded my house to arrest me and that I must escape. I quickly put on one of my friend's old hunting suits, took some money and hurried away on foot along the back ways of the town till I struck the open road, where I engaged a peasant, who in four hours had driven me twenty miles from the town and set me down in the midst of a deeply forested region. On the way I bought a rifle, three hundred cartridges, an ax, a knife, a sheepskin overcoat, tea, salt, dry bread and a kettle. I penetrated into the heart of the wood to an abandoned half-burned hut. From this day I became a genuine trapper but I never dreamed that I should follow this role as long as I did. The next morning I went hunting and had the good fortune to kill two heathcock. I found deer tracks in plenty and felt sure that

Death of the Banker: The Decline and Fall of the Great Financial Dynasties and the Triumph of the Small Investor


Death of the Banker: The Decline and Fall of the Great Financial Dynasties and the Triumph of the Small Investor


$13.95


For anyone interested in the world behind the business-page headlines, this is the book to read." -Publishers WeeklyWith the same breadth of vision and narrative élan he brought to his monumental biographies of the great financiers, Ron Chernow examines the forces that made dynasties like the Morgans, the Warburgs, and the Rothschilds the financial arbiters of the early twentieth century and then rendered them virtually obsolete by the century's end. As he traces the shifting balance of power among investors, borrowers, and bankers, Chernow evokes both the grand theater of capital and the personal dramas of its most fascinating protagonists. Here is Siegmund Warburg, who dropped a client in the heat of a takeover deal because the man wore monogrammed shirt cuffs, as well as the imperious J.P. Morgan, who, when faced with a federal antitrust suit, admonished Theodore Roosevelt to "send your man to my man and they can fix it up." And here are the men who usurped their power, from the go-getters of the 1920s to the masters of the universe of the 1980s. Glittering with perception and anecdote, The Death of the Banker is at once a panorama of twentieth-century finance and a guide to the new era of giant mutual funds on Wall Street."Chernow. delivers a sound, accessible account of the forces shaping capital, credit, currency, and securities markets on the eve of a new millennium. " -Kirkus Reviews

Flapper Era Fashions: From the Roaring 20s


Flapper Era Fashions: From the Roaring 20s


$3.31


New in our successful collection of books showcasing historical, every day fashions comes an assortment of photographs documenting trends in the mid-1920s. During post-World War I's economic revival, women emerged from an era of corsets, long gowns, and formality to express their independence. Sheath dresses were designed to mimic mannish styles, while hemlines and haircuts were shortened. Even men's suits changed, to include exaggerated shoulders and an emphasis on narrow hips. Children often were dressed to honor recent war heroes. More than 380 beautiful images feature hundreds of clothing styles from the catalogs of Bellas Hess & Company, and The Charles William Stores, Inc. Costume designers seeking to recreate an era, collectors looking for vintage clothing, and fashion designers looking for inspiration for today's looks, will all find something new here.

Comments are closed.